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Win lose or draw

Win Lose or Draw
Win Lose or Draw
Win Lose or Draw

Win, Lose or Draw is an American television game show that aired from 1987 to 1990 in syndication and on NBC. It was taped at CBS Television City (one of the few non-CBS game shows to tape there), often in Studios 31, 33, and 43 at various times.[3] It was co-produced by Burt & Bert Productions (headed by Burt Reynolds and Bert Convy, the original host of the syndicated version) and Kline & Friends for Disney’s Buena Vista Television. It has also had two versions on The Disney Channel: Teen Win, Lose or Draw from 1989 to 1992, and a revived version known as Disney’s Win, Lose or Draw which aired in 2014.

The set for the original Win, Lose or Draw was modeled after Burt Reynolds’ living room.

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Dead to rights

Dead to Rights scene

Definition

In the act of committing an error or crime, red-handed. For example, They caught the burglars dead to rights with the Oriental rugs. This phrase uses to rights in the sense of “at once.” [ Slang; mid-1800s]

Etymology

US, 1854, originally New York City criminal slang, thence entered general use. dead (“completely, utterly”) + to rights (“properly”).

Video Game

Dead to Rights
Dead to Rights
Dead to Rights is a video game series focusing on Jack Slate, a police officer in the fictional Grant City, and his K-9 partner Shadow. There are four games in the series. Wikipedia
First release: Dead to Rights; June 3, 2002
Latest release: Dead to Rights: Retribution; April 1, 2010
Genre: Third-person shooter

Dead to rights – Word Detective

Dear Word Detective: All the media and late-night jokesters are having a field day with the latest OJ escapade, of course. Several times I’ve heard or seen the phrase “this time they’ve got him dead to rights,” and I think we all understand what it means. The nearest thing to it in your archives is “caught redhanded,” which is not quite the same thing, nor is “they’ve got the goods on him this time!” But when I (figuratively) stand back and look at “got him dead to rights” it seems a rather strange construct — don’t you think? Anyway, did a specific author (like Mark Twain, or A. Conan Doyle, maybe) originate the phrase? Or just when and where did it come from? — Ken in Houston.

OJ who? Oh, right. Gosh, you know, there are times I almost regret my decision to stop watching TV news a couple of years ago. This isn’t one of them. Not that my tele-exile does much good. Despite my best efforts to avoid details of the Simpson kerfuffle, the basic facts of it seem to have seeped into my noggin by osmosis. Perhaps my fillings are picking up Fox News again.

In any case, just going by what the voices in my head tell me, Mr. Simpson does seem to have been caught “dead to rights,” which is to say that there is no reasonable argument that he did not do what he is said to have done and that, in a just universe, he would be, as the legal scholars put it, “toast.”

“Dead to rights” is indeed an odd expression, dating at least to the mid-19th century, when it was first collected in a glossary of underworld slang (“Vocabulum, or The Rogue’s Lexicon,” by George Matsell, 1859). The first part of the phrase, “dead,” is a slang use of the word to mean “absolutely, without doubt.” This use is more commonly heard in the UK, where it dates back to the 16th century, than in the US. “Dead” meaning “certainly” is based on the earlier use of “dead” to mean, quite logically, “with stillness suggestive of death, absolutely motionless,” a sense we still use when we say someone is “dead asleep.” The “absolutely, without doubt” sense is also found in “dead broke” and “dead certain.”

The “to rights” part of the phrase is a bit more complicated. “To rights” has been used since the 14th century to mean “in a proper manner,” or, later, “in proper condition or order,” a sense we also use in phrases such as “to set to rights,” meaning “to make a situation correct and orderly” (“Employed all the afternoon in my chamber, setting things and papers to rights,” Samuel Pepys, 1662). In the phrase “caught dead to rights,” the connotation is that every formality required by the law has been satisfied, and that the apprehension is what crooks in the UK used to call a “fair cop,” a clean and justifiable arrest. (“Cop,” from the Latin “capere,” to seize, has long been used as slang for “to grab” as well as slang for a police officer.) Of course, there’s many a slip ‘twixt the cop and the lips of the jury, so we shall see. Wake me when it’s over.

Source: http://www.word-detective.com/2008/04/dead-to-rights/
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Frank Zappa

Frank Zappa

“None of us have the promise of tomorrow, God forbid this is my last day on this beautiful earth, it won’t be spent listening to some news person telling me how rotten we are, how rotten life is, heck no, I’m going out and seeing how beautiful life is. As humans, our time on this planet is very limited…Turn off, tune out and turn on your life. Peace” — Frank Zappa

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Statute of Limitations on saying Happy New Year

Statute of Limitations on saying Happy New Year - Curb Your Enthusiasm

statute of limitations

Three days is the statute of limitations on saying Happy New Year. Larry David from Curb Your Enthusiasm.

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Voxel

Voxel
Voxel – Wikipedia

A three dimensional pixel. A hologram compresses 3D information onto a 2D representation. Two different representations of reality. The world is a pixelated world, not a voxelated world. It’s a hologram.

We know our cosmic horizon of the observable universe is at least 1/1000th in volume of the size of the known universe through observation.

In his words, The universe is at least 1000 times larger in volume than the region what we can ever see. The rest is beyond our horizon. This is like an event horizon of a black hole, but it is a cosmic horizon.

What is the meaning of the stuff we can never detect?

How can we confirm it by real observation?

What is the proper description of a world that is bigger than the cosmic horizon? 

Is our cosmic horizon a two-dimensional scrambled hologram of all that lies beyond it?

Leonard Susskind
Leonard Susskind

Leonard Susskind on The World As Hologram.

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Dead to rights

dead to rights. In the act of committing an error or crime, red-handed. For example, They caught the burglars dead to rights with the Oriental rugs. This phrase uses to rights in the sense of “at once.” [ Slang; mid-1800s]

Etymology. US, 1854, originally New York City criminal slang, thence entered general use. dead (“completely, utterly”) + to rights (“properly”).

Dead to Rights

Dead to Rights – Video Game

Dead to Rights is a video game series focusing on Jack Slate, a police officer in the fictional Grant City, and his K-9 partner Shadow. There are four games in the series.

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Goldilocks & the Three Bears Playlist

Goldilocks & the Three Bears cartoon - 1935

Origin of Goldilocks story

The story was first recorded in narrative form by British writer and poet Robert Southey, and first published anonymously as “The Story of the Three Bears” in 1837 in a volume of his writings called The Doctor. … The story of the three bears was in circulation before the publication of Southey’s tale.
 

The Goldilocks principle

From the Wikipedia: The Goldilocks principle states that something must fall within certain margins, as opposed to reaching extremes. The Goldilocks principle is derived from a children’s story “The Three Bears” in which a little girl named Goldilocks finds a house owned by three bears.

Storyline

The Story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears
Once upon a time, there was a little girl named Goldilocks. 
She  went for a walk in the forest.  Pretty soon, she came upon a house. 
She knocked and, when no one answered, she walked right in.

At the table in the kitchen, there were three bowls of porridge. 
Goldilocks was hungry.  She tasted the porridge from the first bowl.
"This porridge is too hot!" she exclaimed.
So, she tasted the porridge from the second bowl.
"This porridge is too cold," she said
So, she tasted the last bowl of porridge.
"Ahhh, this porridge is just right," she said happily and
she ate it all up.
After she'd eaten the three bears' breakfasts she decided
she was feeling a little tired. 
So, she walked into the living room where she saw three chairs. 
Goldilocks sat in the first
chair to rest her feet.  
"This chair is too big!" she exclaimed.
So she sat in the second chair.
"This chair is too big, too!"  she whined.
So she tried the last and smallest chair.
"Ahhh, this chair is just right," she sighed. 
But just as she settled down
into the chair to rest, it broke into pieces!
Goldilocks was very tired by this time,
so she went upstairs to the bedroom. 
She lay down in the first bed, but it was too hard. 
Then she lay in the second bed,
but it was too soft.  Then she lay down in the third bed
and it was just right. 
Goldilocks fell asleep.

As she was sleeping, the three bears came home.
"Someone's been eating my porridge," growled the Papa bear.
"Someone's been eating my porridge," said the Mama bear.
"Someone's been eating my porridge and they ate it all up!"
cried the Baby bear.
"Someone's been sitting in my chair," growled the Papa bear.
"Someone's been sitting in my chair," said the Mama bear.
"Someone's been sitting in my chair and they've broken it all to pieces,"
cried the Baby bear.

They decided to look around some more and when they got upstairs
to the bedroom,
Papa bear growled,
"Someone's been sleeping in my bed,"
"Someone's been sleeping in my bed, too" said the Mama bear
"Someone's been sleeping in my bed and she's still there!"
exclaimed Baby bear.

Just then, Goldilocks woke up and saw the three bears. 
She screamed, "Help!" 
And she jumped up and ran out of the room. 
Goldilocks ran down the stairs, opened the door,
and ran away into the forest. 
And she never returned to the home of the three bears.
THE END

Did You Know?

Cast for Hugh Harman Production 1935

June Foray Baby Bear (voice)
Rudolf Ising Papa Bear (voice)
Martha Wentworth Mama Bear (voice)

This is one of three shorts which were created at Disney and animated at MGM’s animation department led by Harman and Ising. Only the first one, “Merbabies,” was released as a Silly Symphony. The other two were then released as Harman and Ising shorts – they were “The Little Goldfish” and this one, “Goldilocks and the Three Bears.” 


Soundtracks

My Grandfather’s Clock
(1876) (uncredited)
Music by Henry Clay Work
The Irish Washerwoman
(uncredited)
Traditional
Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush
(uncredited)
Traditional

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So Long Mr. Chumps

The Three Stooges Columbia Pictures

The Three Stooges 1941

The stooges are street cleaners who find some valuable bonds and return them to their owner. The man is so grateful that he offers them a big reward if they can find an honest man with executive ability. Their search leads them to a woman who’s fiancée is honest, but he’s in jail. The boys decide to commit a crime so they can go behind bars to find him. In prison the boys locate the man and help him escape, only to find out that their benefactor is a con man and on the way himself to the slammer.—Mitch Shapiro <mshapiro@a.crl.com>

So Long Mr Chumps- 1941 The Three Stooges
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Bobby Three Sticks

The Late Show with Stephen Colbert 7/24/2019

Steven discovers Robert Mueller III has a nickname. It’s “Bobby Three Sticks”.

Steven Colbert – The Late Show
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Knock Three Times – Tony Orlando and Dawn

Tony Orlando and Dawn

Tony Orlando and Dawn was a pop trio that in the 1970s that had 15 Top 40 hits, including one of the best-selling singles of all time.

The group had the No. 1 hits “Candida,” “Knock Three Times,” “He Don’t Love You (Like I Love You)” and “Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree”. “Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree,” released in 1973, is among the 75 best-selling songs of all time, with more than 6 million copies sold.

Knock Three Times – Tony Orlando and Dawn

Lyrics

Hey girl what ya doin' down there
Dancin' alone every night while I live right above you
I can hear your music playin'
I can feel your body swayin'
One floor below me you don't even know me
I love you
Oh my darling
Knock three times on the ceiling if you want me
Twice on the pipe if the answer is no
Oh my sweetness
Means you'll meet me in the hallway
Twice on the pipe means you ain't gonna show
If you look out your window tonight
Pull in the string with the note that's attached to my heart
Read how many times I saw you
How in my silence I adored you
Only in my dreams did that wall between us come apart
Oh my darling
Knock three times on the ceiling if you want me
Twice on the pipe if the answer is no
Oh my sweetness
Means you'll meet me in the hallway
Twice on the pipe means you ain't gonna show
I can hear your music playin'
I can feel your body swayin'
One floor below me you don't even know me
I love you
Oh my darling
Knock three times on the ceiling if you want me
Twice on the pipe if the answer is no
Oh my sweetness
Means you'll meet me in the hallway
Twice on the pipe means you ain't gonna show
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Larry Brown / Larry Russell Brown / Irwin Levine
Knock Three Times lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Spirit Music Group, BMG Rights Management
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Sleeping At Last – “Three” (Official Lyric Video)

Sleeping At Last-Three-Official Lyric Video thumbnail

Published on Nov 23, 2018

“Three” is from Sleeping At Last’s “Atlas: Year Two” project.

Atlas: Three 
Maybe I’ve done enough
And your golden child grew up
Maybe this trophy isn’t real love
And with or without it I’m good enough

Maybe I’ve done enough
Finally catching up
For the first time I see an image of my brokenness
Utterly worthy of love

Maybe I’ve done enough

And I finally see myself
Through the eyes of no one else
It’s so exhausting on this silver screen
Where I play the role of anyone but me

And I finally see myself
Find more lyrics at ※ Mojim.com
Unabridged and overwhelmed
A mess of a story I’m ashamed to tell
But I’m slowly learning how to break this spell

And I finally see myself

Now I only want what’s real
To let my heart feel what it feels
Gold, silver, or bronze hold no value here
Where work and rest are equally revered

I only want what’s real
I set aside the highlight reel
And leave my greatest failures on display with an asterisk
Worthy of love anyway

Sleeping at Last’s Three
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Triple dog dare

Scene from A Christmas Story - I triple dog dare you

Verb. triple dog dare. (slang, US) Used to denote compounding levels of dare”seriousness”; the escalation of a double dog dare. I triple dog dare you to jump.

To “double dog dare” someone is to challenge them emphatically or defiantly, although the “challenge” is often meant humorously, or at least not very seriously: “I double dog dare you to eat the entire box of doughnuts!”

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