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The Dollars Trilogy | Clint Eastwood

Although not Leone’s intention, the three films came to be considered a trilogy following the exploits of the same so-called “Man with No Name” (portrayed by Clint Eastwood, wearing the same clothes and acting with the same mannerisms).

The films were not originally intended to be a series, but the American distributor, United Artists, invented the concept for marketing purposes, establishing Clint Eastwood’s character in each film to actually be the same person. Thus, the films have been considered by many to be a series ever since. Additionally, a series of novels released in the years after the films establish the films as belonging to the same continuity.

The Dollars Trilogy
The Dollars Trilogy

Clint stated that he bought a poncho at Western Costume in Hollywood as he thought “Joe” or THE MAN WITH NO NAME from “A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS” would wear one (his own idea) but Sergio Leone found the “green one” in Spain and liked it better.

The Dollars Trilogy film dates
The Dollars Trilogy film dates

Fist Full of Dollars

Clint Eastwood in A Fistful of Dollars (1964), directed by Sergio Leone. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. A mysterious stranger “The Man With No Name” (Clint Eastwood) drifts into the Mexican village of San Miguel in the midst of a power struggle among the three Rojo brothers (Antonio Prieto, Benny Reeves, Sieghardt Rupp) and sheriff John Baxter (Wolfgang Lukschy). When a regiment of Mexican soldiers bearing gold intended to pay for new weapons is waylaid by the Rojo brothers, the stranger inserts himself into the middle of the long-simmering battle, selling false information to both sides for his own benefit.

For a Few Dollars More

In the Wild West, a murderous outlaw known as El Indio (Gian Maria Volonte) and his gang are terrorizing and robbing the citizens of the region. With a bounty on El Indio’s head, two bounty hunters, Monco (Clint Eastwood) and Col. Douglas Mortimer (Lee Van Cleef), come to collect the prize. Upon their first meeting, the two men view each other as rivals, but they eventually agree to become partners in their mutual pursuit of the vicious criminal.

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

In the Southwest during the Civil War, a mysterious stranger, Joe (Clint Eastwood), and a Mexican outlaw, Tuco (Eli Wallach), form an uneasy partnership — Joe turns in the bandit for the reward money, then rescues him just as he is being hanged. When Joe’s shot at the noose goes awry during one escapade, a furious Tuco tries to have him murdered. The men re-team abruptly, however, to beat out a sadistic criminal and the Union army and find $20,000 that a soldier has buried in the desert.

Continue reading The Dollars Trilogy | Clint Eastwood
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Bill Maher | the easiest three predictions in the world

Some presidents spend their post presidency building homes for the poor, or raising money for charity, or painting their toes. Trump has spent his figuring out how to pull off the coup he couldn’t pull off last time. Here’s the easiest three predictions in the world.

* Trump will run in 2024

* He will get the Republican nomination

* And whatever happens on election night the day he will announce that he won

I’ve be saying it ever since he lost.

Bill Maher | Real Time | October 8 2021
Bill Maher | Real Time
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Pawn Stars | Silver Dollar Certificate

This series opens the doors to the only family-run pawnshop in Las Vegas, where three generations of the Harrison family use their sharp-eyed skills to assess what’s real and what’s fake. Objects the colourful customers bring in range from the obscure to the truly historic, and it’s up to the guys at the Gold & Silver Pawn Shop – with help at times from their network of experts – to reveal the sometimes surprising answer to `What’s this worth?’.

Genre: Reality television. Original release: July 19, 2009 – present
Pawn Stars | Silver Dollar Certificate

Rick talks about three different people making the engraving for the silver dollar certificate to prevent counterfeiting.

Rick Harrison
Pawn Stars shop cast
Pawn Stars shop cast | Rick Harrison, Chumlee, Corey Harrison & Richard Harrison
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Judge Judy

This courtroom programme stars former family court judge Judy Sheindlin. Each episode finds Judge Judy presiding over real small-claims cases inside a televised courtroom. Her no-nonsense, wisecracking approach has been unsuccessfully copied by other TV court judges.First episode date: September 16, 1996

Judge Judy

“Touch every third person, you’re going to find an idiot”.

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A scene from The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly R 1966 ‧ Western/Spaghetti western ‧ 2h 58m

Six, perfect number. Isn’t three the perfect number? Yeah, I got six more bullets in my gun.

Story line

In the Southwest during the Civil War, a mysterious stranger, Joe (Clint Eastwood), and a Mexican outlaw, Tuco (Eli Wallach), form an uneasy partnership — Joe turns in the bandit for the reward money, then rescues him just as he is being hanged. When Joe’s shot at the noose goes awry during one escapade, a furious Tuco tries to have him murdered. The men re-team abruptly, however, to beat out a sadistic criminal and the Union army and find $20,000 that a soldier has buried in the desert.

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Solar Eclipse Identity

Solar Eclipse Identity
Solar Eclipse Identity

Game: use your day of birth, the last number of your birth year, and the zodiac sign to find your Solar Eclipse Identity.

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Tri-Cornered Baseball Game – 1944 Dodgers Yankees Giants

Crowd buys $56,500,000 in War Bonds
Crowd buys $56,500,000 in War Bonds

The three way game played on June 26, 1944 was set up to support the war effort with an unusual exhibition game played by the Yankees, Dodgers, and the Giants at the Polo Grounds. Presented by the War Bond Sports committee in connection with the Fifth War Loan. The First War Loan began on November 30, 1942. The Fifth War Loan was the largest of the eight, and by its conclusion on July 8, 1944, $20.6 billion had been raised. $56.5 million contributed by the Tri-Cornered game at the Polo Grounds. 

  The crowd of 50,000 contributes $5.5 million to attend, while the Bond Clothing Co. pays $1 million in bonds for an autographed program. The overwhelming majority of the money comes from the city of New York, with Mayor Fiorello La Guardia purchasing $50 million worth of bonds. 
Dickey, Pennock, Schang

Dickey, Pennock, Schang

 The three-cornered baseball game started with Hitting, running, and throwing contests. In between contests, Al Schacht, the Clown Prince of Baseball, entertained the crowd of 50,000, and admission to the game was by purchase of series E, F, and G war bonds. The 40,000 general admission unreserved seats cost one $25 war bond; the 5,809 reserved seats in the lower stands went for a $100 bond; the box seats both upper and lower cost the fan a $1,000 war bond. Bleacher seats were free to servicemen. 
Dickey, Pennock, Schang

Dickey, Pennock, Schang

 Between the Contests and the game took center stage at second base where radio and movie comedian Milton Berle “boisterously ushered in” a series of musical numbers. Then former Mayor James J. Walker took charge as master of ceremonies to introduce some New York baseball oldtimers: Zack Wheat, Nap Rucker and Otto Miller of the Dodgers; the Giants’ Roger Bresnahan, George (Hooks) Wiltse, and Moose McCormick; the Yankees’ Wally Schang, Herb Pennock, and U.S. Navy Lieutenant Commander Bill Dickey.

Giants vs Dodgers vs Yankees
Giants vs Dodgers vs Yankees

Giants vs Dodgers vs Yankees – The setup for a three-way nine inning game was simple: The Dodgers and Yankees played the first inning while the Giants sat out; the Dodgers and Giants played the second inning while the Yankees sat out; the Yankees and Giants played the third inning while the Dodgers sat out. The same order continued to the game’s end.

Scoreboard
Scoreboard

Fifth War Bond

Fifth War Bond

Fifth War Bond

This is a 1944 Dodgers Yankees Giants Tri-Cornered Baseball Game Polo Grounds Fifth War Loan Program. The glossy 16 page, black & white program was issued by the War Bond Sports committee. Listed in the program’s centerfold rosters are the following Hall of Fame members: Dodgers Paul Waner and Leo Durocher, Giants Joe Medwick, Mel Ott and Ernie Lombardi, Yankees Joe McCarthy and Umpire Jocko Conlan. Many other stars of the time are also listed: Dixie Walker, Ed Stanky, Ralph Branca, Howie Schultz, Whit Wyatt, Augie Galan, Billy Jurges, Gus Mancuso, Buddy Kerr, Johnny Allen, George Stirnweiss, Hank Borowy, Joe Page.

Source: http://keymancollectibles.com/publications/threewaygame.htm

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Flower Child Name

Flower child name

Last name
Last name was cropped, so here’s a duplicate

What is your Flower Child Name?

  1. First letter of your first name.

  2. Color shirt you are wearing.

  3. First letter of your last name.

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Win lose or draw

Win Lose or Draw

Win Lose or Draw
Win Lose or Draw

Win, Lose or Draw is an American television game show that aired from 1987 to 1990 in syndication and on NBC. It was taped at CBS Television City (one of the few non-CBS game shows to tape there), often in Studios 31, 33, and 43 at various times.[3] It was co-produced by Burt & Bert Productions (headed by Burt Reynolds and Bert Convy, the original host of the syndicated version) and Kline & Friends for Disney’s Buena Vista Television. It has also had two versions on The Disney Channel: Teen Win, Lose or Draw from 1989 to 1992, and a revived version known as Disney’s Win, Lose or Draw which aired in 2014.

The set for the original Win, Lose or Draw was modeled after Burt Reynolds’ living room.

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Dead to rights

Dead to Rights scene

Definition

In the act of committing an error or crime, red-handed. For example, They caught the burglars dead to rights with the Oriental rugs. This phrase uses to rights in the sense of “at once.” [ Slang; mid-1800s]

Etymology

US, 1854, originally New York City criminal slang, thence entered general use. dead (“completely, utterly”) + to rights (“properly”).

Video Game

Dead to Rights
Dead to Rights

Dead to Rights is a video game series focusing on Jack Slate, a police officer in the fictional Grant City, and his K-9 partner Shadow. There are four games in the series. Wikipedia
First release: Dead to Rights; June 3, 2002
Latest release: Dead to Rights: Retribution; April 1, 2010
Genre: Third-person shooter

Dead to rights – Word Detective

Dear Word Detective: All the media and late-night jokesters are having a field day with the latest OJ escapade, of course. Several times I’ve heard or seen the phrase “this time they’ve got him dead to rights,” and I think we all understand what it means. The nearest thing to it in your archives is “caught redhanded,” which is not quite the same thing, nor is “they’ve got the goods on him this time!” But when I (figuratively) stand back and look at “got him dead to rights” it seems a rather strange construct — don’t you think? Anyway, did a specific author (like Mark Twain, or A. Conan Doyle, maybe) originate the phrase? Or just when and where did it come from? — Ken in Houston.

OJ who? Oh, right. Gosh, you know, there are times I almost regret my decision to stop watching TV news a couple of years ago. This isn’t one of them. Not that my tele-exile does much good. Despite my best efforts to avoid details of the Simpson kerfuffle, the basic facts of it seem to have seeped into my noggin by osmosis. Perhaps my fillings are picking up Fox News again.

In any case, just going by what the voices in my head tell me, Mr. Simpson does seem to have been caught “dead to rights,” which is to say that there is no reasonable argument that he did not do what he is said to have done and that, in a just universe, he would be, as the legal scholars put it, “toast.”

“Dead to rights” is indeed an odd expression, dating at least to the mid-19th century, when it was first collected in a glossary of underworld slang (“Vocabulum, or The Rogue’s Lexicon,” by George Matsell, 1859). The first part of the phrase, “dead,” is a slang use of the word to mean “absolutely, without doubt.” This use is more commonly heard in the UK, where it dates back to the 16th century, than in the US. “Dead” meaning “certainly” is based on the earlier use of “dead” to mean, quite logically, “with stillness suggestive of death, absolutely motionless,” a sense we still use when we say someone is “dead asleep.” The “absolutely, without doubt” sense is also found in “dead broke” and “dead certain.”

The “to rights” part of the phrase is a bit more complicated. “To rights” has been used since the 14th century to mean “in a proper manner,” or, later, “in proper condition or order,” a sense we also use in phrases such as “to set to rights,” meaning “to make a situation correct and orderly” (“Employed all the afternoon in my chamber, setting things and papers to rights,” Samuel Pepys, 1662). In the phrase “caught dead to rights,” the connotation is that every formality required by the law has been satisfied, and that the apprehension is what crooks in the UK used to call a “fair cop,” a clean and justifiable arrest. (“Cop,” from the Latin “capere,” to seize, has long been used as slang for “to grab” as well as slang for a police officer.) Of course, there’s many a slip ‘twixt the cop and the lips of the jury, so we shall see. Wake me when it’s over.

Source: http://www.word-detective.com/2008/04/dead-to-rights/
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Frank Zappa

Frank Zappa

“None of us have the promise of tomorrow, God forbid this is my last day on this beautiful earth, it won’t be spent listening to some news person telling me how rotten we are, how rotten life is, heck no, I’m going out and seeing how beautiful life is. As humans, our time on this planet is very limited…Turn off, tune out and turn on your life. Peace” — Frank Zappa

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Statute of Limitations on saying Happy New Year

Statute of Limitations on saying Happy New Year - Curb Your Enthusiasm

statute of limitations

Three days is the statute of limitations on saying Happy New Year. Larry David from Curb Your Enthusiasm.