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3 Self-Help Books to Read If You Want To Change Your Life

Scottish author Samuel Smiles unknowingly gave birth to a new sub-genre of non-fiction with his 1859 work, Self-Help. In it, Smiles offered inspiring quotes for working class individuals who wanted to write their own rags-to-riches story through perseverance. The book sold over a quarter of a million copies, making it a bestselling title of its time. Medium reported that it also marked the beginnings of the self-help book genre, which is popular for a reason: it aims to provide insight and actionable advice for its target readers. And there are many who simply seek wisdom and comfort in what they read.

If you’re on a similar quest for self-improvement, these three titles might give you what you’re looking for:

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

According to writer Susan Cain, nearly a third of the population classify as introverts and many more have introverted qualities. Her book, Quiet, gave many readers power during the lockdowns of COVID-19 as social needs became difficult to fulfil in isolation. It’s a comforting read that teaches us that many of the influential figures in history, from Rosa Parks to Tom Hanks, are introverts themselves. They’ve had great success in a society that very much favors the “extrovert ideal”.

A Business Insider book review highlights three key takeaways for readers:

  1. Society still values extroversion over introversion in business, politics, education, and other spheres — and this needs to change.

  2. Introverts and extroverts can create a dynamic relationship as they’ll have more success collaborating.

  3. There’s nothing wrong with being an introvert (or having introverted traits) and it’s time to find your power in it. If you want to know how, Cain’s Quiet is a great place to start.

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg

Journalist Charles Duhigg’s bestselling book The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business breaks down the science behind our habits and rituals and how we can change our detrimental ones. He argues that these habits — whether it’s on exercise, productivity or financial success — are within our control. That said, our post on The Power of Habits notes that the process of reforming habits contains three important elements: a cue, a routine, and a reward. When you are able to recognize these three, you can change any habit and turn it into one that benefits you. So whether you’re trying to, say, drop your smoking habit or be less of a micromanager to your employees, The Power of Habit is a helpful how-to guide for self-improvement.

Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams by Matthew Walker

Sleep is, neuroscientist Matthew Walker’s book argues, the most important human need, yet it is also one of the most overlooked. The book explains the science behind how sleep works, but it is also a deep dive into why we need to at all. He also brings to light the health challenges that you can experience with lack of sleep, such as lowered immune function, reduced cognitive skills, and repressed growth. Getting quality sleep (not just sleeping more) can truly change your life in at least three ways:

  1. It can make you less vulnerable to disease, more focused, and more energetic.

  2. Sleep can regulate your mood and reduce your risk of mental health conditions like anxiety and depression.

  3. The healthier you are physically and mentally, the more energy and time you can devote to the important aspects of your life, such as your work, hobbies, and relationships.

If you’re having trouble hitting the hay, take a crack at Matthew walker’s self-help book. He himself says in the introduction, “So please, feel free to ebb and flow into and out of consciousness during this entire book. I will take absolutely no offense. On the contrary, I would be delighted.”

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Solar Eclipse Identity

Solar Eclipse Identity
Solar Eclipse Identity

Game: use your day of birth, the last number of your birth year, and the zodiac sign to find your Solar Eclipse Identity.

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O’ Great Spirit – Cherokee Prayer

O’ great spirit - Cherokee Prayer

O’ GREAT SPIRIT

help me always to speak the truth quietly, to listen with an open mind when others speak, and to remember the peace that may be found in silence.

Cherokee Prayer

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Time is …

Time is ...
Time is …
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The Symbolism and Spiritual Significance of the Number Three

The Spiritual Meaning of Numbers

Tetragrammaton by Francisco Goya: "The Name of God", YHWH in triangle, detail from fresco Adoration of the Name of God, 1772
Tetragrammaton by Francisco Goya: “The Name of God”, YHWH in triangle, detail from fresco Adoration of the Name of God, 1772

Three is the first number to which the meaning “all” was given. It is The Triad, being the number of the whole as it contains the beginning, a middle and an end. The power of three is universal and is the tripartide nature of the world as heaven, earth, and waters. It is human as body, soul and spirit.

In the first three numbers, all of the others are synthesized. From the union of oneness and duality (which is its reflection), that is, from triad, proceed all of the other numbers, and from this primordial triangle all figures derive.

There is also, for traditional civilizations, a direct relationship between numbers and letters of the alphabet, to the point where, with many alphabets, numbers were represented by letters, and had no special signs of their own. This is not the case with the early American cultures, which knew no alphabet, but we wish to call attention to this correspondence because not only the alphabetical code, but the numerical one, as well, describe all reality: that is, everything that is numerable or namable–in the sense of “ciphers,” harmonious measures, “proportions”–in sum, the totality of the cosmos, of the knowable.

This threeness or triad, has always been considered sacred–like oneness, duality, and all numbers–by virtue of its very properties and particular attributes. These properties and attributes are manifested in its threefold nature, which of itself is the inevitable expression of a principle, an archetypal fact, that solidifies in a series, as a representation of ideas and energies that materialize in magical, mysterious fashion while obeying precise, universal laws, which the numerical codes and their geometrical correspondences symbolize.

Trinity Symbol
Trinity Symbol

This symbol a triad or trinity. It is a symbol of the unity of body, mind and spirit. The symbol is of universal significance – it is found throughout history and all over the world. It was popularized early in this century by the Russian-born artist, philosopher and scientist Nicholas Roerich. (http://www.roerich.org). It can be interpreted in many different senses: spirit/mind/body in a circle of synthesis; past/present/future enclosed in the ring of eternity; art/science/religion bound in a circle of culture.

Chintamani
Chintamani

The oldest of Indian symbols, Chintamani, the sign of happiness, is composed of this symbol and it can be found in the Temple of Heaven in Beijing. It appears in the Three Treasures of Tibet; on the breast of the Christ in Memling’s famous painting; on the Madonna of Strasbourg; on the shields of the Crusaders and coat of arms of the Templars. It can be seen on the blades of the famous Caucasian swords called “Gurda” and on the swords of Japanese nobility.

It appears as a symbol in several philosophical systems. It can be discovered on the images of Gessar Khan and Rigden Djapo; on the “Tamga” of Timurlane and on the coat of arms of the Popes. It can be seen in the works of ancient Spanish painters and of Titian, and on the ancient ikon of St. Nicholas in Bari and that of St. Sergius and the Holy Trinity. It appears on the coat of arms of the city of Samarkand, on Ethiopian and Coptic antiquities, on the rocks of Mongolia, on Tibetan rings, on Buddhist banners, on the breast ornaments of all the Himalayan countries, and on the pottery of the Neolithic age.

Continue reading The Symbolism and Spiritual Significance of the Number Three

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Noam Chomsky

“When questions of decision, reason or choice of action arise, human science is at a loss.”

Noam Chomsky

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QPR – Three Steps Anyone Can Take to Save a Life

What is QPR?

QPR logo
QPR

QPR stands for Question, Persuade and Refer — three simple steps anyone can learn to help save a life from suicide.

Our Mission

To save lives and reduce suicidal behaviors by providing innovative, practical and proven suicide prevention training. We believe that quality education empowers all people, regardless of their background, to make a positive difference in the life of someone they know.

What does QPR mean?

QPR stands for Question, Persuade, and Refer — the 3 simple steps anyone can learn to help save a life from suicide.

Just as people trained in CPR and the Heimlich Maneuver help save thousands of lives each year, people trained in QPR learn how to recognize the warning signs of a suicide crisis and how to question, persuade, and refer someone to help. Each year thousands of Americans, like you, are saying “Yes” to saving the life of a friend, colleague, sibling, or neighbor.

QPR can be learned in our Gatekeeper course in as little as one hour.

What is a Gatekeeper?

According to the Surgeon General’s National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (2001), a gatekeeper is someone in a position to recognize a crisis and the warning signs that someone may be contemplating suicide.

Gatekeepers can be anyone, but include parents, friends, neighbors, teachers, ministers, doctors, nurses, office supervisors, squad leaders, foremen, police officers, advisors, caseworkers, firefighters, and many others who are strategically positioned to recognize and refer someone at risk of suicide.

Read more-Partial Source: https://qprinstitute.com/about-qpr

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The Three Gates – Eknath Easwaran

The Three Gates – Eknath Easwaran

The Sufis advise us to speak only after our words have managed to pass through three gates. At the first gate, we ask ourselves “Are these words true?” If so, we let them pass on; if not, back they go. At the second gate, we ask, “Are they necessary?” At the last gate , we ask, “Are they kind?” – Eknath Easwaran

The Bhagavad Gita for Daily Living - THREE VOLUME SET
The Bhagavad Gita for Daily Living – THREE VOLUME SET

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The Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther Knig Jr.
Martin Luther King Jr

Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

Speech Text:

I want to use as the subject from which to preach: “The Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.” (All right) You know, they used to tell us in Hollywood that in order for a movie to be complete, it had to be three-dimensional. Well, this morning I want to seek to get over to each of us that if life itself is to be complete, (Yes) it must be three-dimensional. . .

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Lactantius

Lactantius

Lactantius
Lactantius

“Cicero, in his treatise concerning the Nature of the Gods, having said that three Jupiters were enumerated by theologians, adds that the third was of Crete, the son of Saturn, and that his tomb is shown in that island.”

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Buckminster Fuller explains threeness in the Universe

Buckminster Fuller

Buckminster Fuller
Buckminster Fuller

Buckminster Fuller

  1. The stability of the triangle
  2. The one quantum created in the tetrahedron
  3. How the icosahedron, the octahedron and tetrahedron create everything in the universe

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The Three Umpires

Give me a break ump!

Three Blind UmpiresThree Blind Umpires

One weekend the junior umpire, the senior umpire, and the master of all umpires got together to discuss their craft.

After hours and hours of deliberation and thoughtful discussion, the junior umpire stands up and he says “I call ‘em the way I see ‘em“.

The other umpires nod, but then the senior umpire stands up and he says “I call ‘em the way they are”.

The room is silent. Finally, the master of all umpires says “Gentlemen, they ain’t nothing till I call ‘em”.


The Three Umpires by Norman Rockwell
The Three Umpires by Norman Rockwell

Tough Call – also known as Game Called Because of Rain, Bottom of the Sixth, or The Three Umpires – is a 1948 painting by American artist Norman Rockwell, painted for the April 23, 1949, cover of The Saturday Evening Post magazine.

Robert M Woods

Among the many conversations I have had with Great Books students over the years, none is more lively than when we discuss various theories of truth.

It seems to always come up when we are reading and talking about Thomas Aquinas’s Summa. In order to make immediate connection with them, I tell the story about three umpires in a bar after a game. These officials are discussing what really happens when they call balls and strikes. What they are really doing is discussing the relationship between reality and human apprehension of said reality.
The umpires are discussing the relationship between the pitching of the ball and the calling of said pitch by the umpire. It goes like this:

1) When it comes to making calls behind the home plate, I call it the way it is….
2) When it comes to making calls behind home plate, I call it the way I see it….
3) When it comes to making calls behind home plate, it ain’t nothing until I call it….

1) Is it possible that this umpire would ever admit to being wrong?

2) Is the reality of the ball and strike rooted in the perception of the umpire?

3) What if the pitcher threw the ball twenty feet over the catcher’s head and it struck the press box and the umpire called it a strike, it would be, but he would be fired–why?

Those of us who have played or enjoyed the game of baseball get the import of this conversation. The truth is that it is easy to hear what each is saying and recognize the legitimacy of their respective claim. Additionally, it is also relatively easy to extrapolate from their statements and expand them to the point of seeing how wrong they are in their claim.

Source:http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/author/robert-m-woods