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Warren Buffet | 3 Life Decisions

Warren Buffett Says 3 Decisions in Life Separate
High Achievers From Mere Dreamers. If the third-richest man in the universe says it, who’s to argue?

BY MARCEL SCHWANTES, INC. CONTRIBUTING
EDITOR AND FOUNDER, LEADERSHIP FROM THE CORE. 7/14/2022

Warren Buffet​
Warren Buffet

Warren Buffett is smarter than me. Much smarter. But, outside of his complete mastery of all things related to investment, is the earthly wisdom Buffett imparts on us mind-boggling? Probably not. It’s the fact Warren Buffett is saying it. He is articulating, in the simplest of terms, things our eighth-grade teacher could have told us, but their coming from Buffett is what makes all the difference.

Nearing the age of 90, the Oracle of Omaha is a success juggernaut whose common sense resonates deep within our souls. Some of his advice just might transform you, but you need to apply it. Here are three inspiring Buffett lessons to move you from dreamer to high achiever.

  1. Don’t risk what you have to get something you don’t need. Buffett once advised graduating students at the University of Florida that he has witnessed both businesses and individuals put themselves at risk to chase after bigger things, usually out of greed when they should have held back.

Buffett said, “If you risk something that is important to you for something that is unimportant to you, it just doesn’t make sense. I don’t care if the odds you succeed are 99 to 1 or 1,000 to 1.”

  1. Invest in relationships with honest and ethical people.

He also asked University of Florida students to think of a classmate they felt had the makings of success long term, such that they would want to get 10 percent of that person’s earnings for the rest of their lives.
“You would probably pick the one you responded the best to, the one who has the leadership qualities, the one who is able to get other people to carry out their interests,” said Buffett. “That would be the person who is generous, honest, and who gave credit to other people for their own ideas.”

  1. Measure your life’s success through one word: love.
    In the Buffett biography, The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life, Buffett explains that the highest measure of success in life comes “by how many of the people you want to have love you actually do love you.”

Some people die filthy rich and get buildings named after them but “the truth is that nobody in the world loves them,” says Buffett. In the end, the ultimate test of how you’ve lived your life comes down to love.
“The trouble with love is that you can’t buy it. You can buy sex. You can buy testimonial dinners. But the only way to get love is to be lovable. You’d like to think you could write a check: I’ll buy a million dollars’ worth of love. But it doesn’t work that way. The more you give love away, the more you get,” asserts Buffett.

Warren Buffet​
Warren Buffet

Source: Inc.

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upmanship

One-upmanship, also called “one-upsmanship”, is the art or practice of successively outdoing a competitor. The term has been extended to a generic, often punning extension, upmanship, used for any assertion of superiority: for instance, photon upmanship, Native Upmanship, and so on. Wikipedia

The Audiopedia

Find another word for one-upmanship. In this page you can discover 22 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for one-upmanship, like: bettering, artfulness, cageyness, canniness, competitive-advantage, competitive edge, cunning, cutthroat, outfoxing, outsmarting and outwitting. Read more

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The Metre – the repeating circle & triangulation

The Metre (meaning measure) was one ten-millionth of the distance from the North Pole to the Equator! France embarked on a first large scale measurement. It took 7 years to measure the distance from Dunkirk to Barsalona. They used triangulation with an instrument called the Repeating Circle along with trigonometry.

The standardization of measurement: the Metre

Creating the Metre – a universal standard

By the 16th century, there we over 250,000 weights and measures in Europe. This effected trade, navigation, building plans, etc. Fire hoses would not connect from town to town. France chose to create a standard by measuring something unchangeable. They chose the Earth. Before this standardization, the human body (the Ruler of the land) would make new measurements upon gaining power.

The Repeating Circle

Repeating Circle
Repeating Circle

DESCRIPTION

This is one of two double repeating circles that Ferdinand Rudolph Hassler, the first superintendent of the U. S. Coast Survey, ordered from Edward Troughton in London in 1812, and that was shipped in 1815. The large circle may be angled from vertical to horizontal to the opposite vertical position. It is graduated to 10 minutes, and read by four verniers and two magnifiers to single minutes.

A repeating circle is a geodetic instrument with two telescopes that is designed to reduce errors by repeated observations taken on all parts of the circumference of a circle. The form was developed by the Chevalier de Borda, first executed by Etienne Lenoir in Paris around 1789, and popular for about 50 years.

Ref: F. R. Hassler, “Papers on Various Subjects Connected with the Survey of the Coast of the United States,” Transactions of the American Philosophical Society 2 (1825): 232-420, on 315-320 and pl. VII. “The Repeating Circle Without Reflection, as made by Troughton,” in The Cyclopaedia: or, Universal Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and Literature, edited by Abraham Rees (London, 1819), Vol. VII, Art “Circle.”

Image credit:

NAME: repeating circle MAKER: Troughton and Simms PLACE MADE: United Kingdom: England, London MEASUREMENTS: overall: 32 1/8 in x 26 3/4 in x 17 in; 81.6356 cm x 67.945 cm x 43.18 cm upper circle: 17 1/2 in; 44.45 cm circle at base: 13 1/2 in; 34.29 cm telescope: 24 in; 60.96 cm overall; base: 16 3/4 in x 15 1/4 in x 16 in; 42.545 cm x 38.735 cm x 40.64 cm overall; horizontal circle: 13 in x 23 in x 20 in; 33.02 cm x 58.42 cm x 50.8 cm ID NUMBER PH.314640 CATALOG NUMBER 314640 ACCESSION NUMBER 208213


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Duck typing in python

When I see a bird that walks like a duck and swims like a duck and quacks like a duck I called that bird a duck

J. W. Riley

The Python code language is dynamically typed. In many languages (C++, Java) you do need to explicitly declare the types of variables. Python uses duck typing for all operations (function calls, method calls, and operators). You can treat an object as a duck. It raises a TypeError at runtime if an operation cannot be applied to an object because it is of an inappropriate type.

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kerfuffle

ker·fuf·fle

/kərˈfəfəl/

noun

INFORMAL•BRITISH

  1. a commotion or fuss, especially one caused by conflicting views. For example, “there was a kerfuffle over the chairmanship”.
  2. a disturbance or commotion typically caused by a dispute or conflict. “In all the kerfuffle, nobody seemed to have noticed Harry, which suited him perfectly”.
  3. Example: “Given Noah’s social media kerfuffle with Kanye West, viewers should also be attuned to any biting commentary.” — Melissa Ruggieri, USA TODAY, 30 Mar. 2022

Synonyms

disturbance, hoo-ha, to-do, commotion, flutter, hurly-burly, disruption, hoo-hah and brouhaha.

Origin

The root of “kerfuffle” is the very old Scots verb “fuffle,” which first appeared in print in the early 16th century and means “to throw into disorder.” The Oxford English Dictionary suggests that the “ker” part of “kerfuffle” may hare come from the Gaelic word “car,” meaning “to twist, bend or turn around.” In the case of “kerfuffle,” that would serve as a sort of intensive element, giving us the sense of “a twisted up, confused ruckus or dispute.” Sounds like every “kerfuffle” I’ve ever seen.

My Little Pony Kerfuffle

Kerfuffle - My Little Pony
Kerfuffle

Sources: google, http://www.word-detective.com/2009/04/kerfuffle/, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/kerfuffle#examples

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3 Sins of Heracles (Hercules)

Heracles was the greatest of the Greek heroes, the ancestor of royal clans who claimed to be Heracleidae (Ἡρακλεῖδαι), and a champion of the Olympian order against chthonic monsters. In Rome and the modernWest, he is known as Hercules, with whom the later Roman emperors, in particular Commodus and Maximian, often identified themselves. – Wikipedia

The Three Sins of Heracles

Excerpt from Georges Dumézil

Heracles is the Greek reflex of a far more ancient Indo-European mythic figure, arques Dumézil-a warrior figure who commits three sins, violating each stratum of tripartite Indo-European society. Dumézil here follows the account of Heracles’ three sins preserved in the work of Diodorus Siculus, a Greek historian of the first century B.. Heracles’ twelve-year servitude to Eurystheus was only the first of three “penalties” the hero would suffer, each the consequence of his sin, each bound up with mental or physical ailment. Coqnate heroic figures among other Indo-European peoples to whom Dumézil makes reference in this selection are Indra, warrior deity par excellence of India, and Starcatherus, the Danish avatar of a well-known Scandinavian hero (Old Norse Starkar), whose tale is preserved in the Gesta Danorum of the twelfth/thirteenth-century cleric Saxo Gram-
maticus. (RDW)

Download/Read the full passage in pdf by Georges Dumézil below.

Read more

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Trilogies as Persuasion | 1 min watch

Little Lawyer Lesson #1: Use Trilogies #shorts. Robert Gouveia Esq.

Trilogies can be very powerful tools of persuasion.
Terence McCarthy, author of MacCarthy on
Cross-Examination, explains just how important
trilogies are in trials.

Little Lawyer Lesson #1: Use Trilogies

Robert Gouveia (formerly Robert Gruler) is a
criminal defense lawyer in Scottsdale, Arizona,
and host of Watching the Watchers, a show
focused on Accountability, Transparency and
Justice.

Source: https://youtube.com/shorts/2Pg82ju0J3c?feature=share

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No ifs, ands, or buts

The phrase no ifs, ands, or buts is a list of words that are often used to begin a sentence that is an explanation or excuse for bad behavior or for not fulfilling an obligation. Most often, no ifs, ands or buts is one of those phrases that is expressed in informal, spoken English.

If someone says they don’t want to hear no ifs, ands, or buts then that means they don’t want to hear any excuses. Example: Jimmy has been relaxing all morning, so his mother said to him, “It’s time for you to do some house chores.

This expression uses the conjunctions to stand for the conditions and objections that they introduce. The earliest phrase to appear was ifs and ands in the 1600s. This phrase is actually an emphatic redundancy, for and often meant “if.” But was tacked on to this pair soon afterward.

President Biden speaking on Covid relief.
Covid relief | President Biden 2021
Partial sources: Dictionary.com, Google.com, Cartoon credit: Mark Anderson
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Security & Exchange Commission

March 6, 2022.

Gary Gensler (SEC Chairman) interview on Jon Stewart speaking about the three pillars of the SEC mission.

  • Investor protection
  • Facilitating capital formation
  • Facilitating fair orderly markets
Jon Stewart interviewing Gary Gensler (SEC)

Gary Gensler is an American government official and former investment banker serving as the chair of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Gensler previously led the Biden–Harris transition’s Federal Reserve, Banking, and Securities Regulators agency review team.

Jon Stewart is an American comedian, writer, producer, director, political commentator, actor, and television host. He hosted The Daily Show, a satirical news program on Comedy Central, from 1999 to 2015. Stewart now hosts The Problem with Jon Stewart, which premiered September 2021 on Apple TV+. Wikipedia

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The Earth’s seasons

The Earth’s seasons are caused by three factors:

  • The Earth orbits the Sun once a year in a nearly circular orbit.
  • The Earth’s axis of rotation (the straight line through the center of the Earth between the north and south poles) is not perpendicular to the plane of the Earth’s orbit. The Earth’s axis is tilted by about 23.4° from the the direction perpendiular to the orbital plane.
  • The orientation of the Earth’s axis in space remains nearly constant even as the Earth revolves around the Sun. It always points in the general direction of the star Polaris.
Sun track

sun track

The result is that when the Earth is on one side of its orbit, the south pole is tilted toward the Sun (by as much as 23.4°) and the southern hemisphere experiences summer. Six months later, when the Earth is on the opposite side of its orbit, the north pole is tilted toward the Sun (by as much as 23.4°) and the northern hemisphere experiences summer. (Views of the Sun’s illumination on the Earth on any date are available here.) What we see from our viewpoint in the Earth’s northern hemisphere is that the Sun’s apparent daily track across the sky is much higher (that is, more northerly) in summer, and lower (more southerly) in winter. From horizon to horizon, the Sun’s track is longer in summer and shorter in winter; so that in summer, sunrises are much earlier and sunsets are much later than in winter. See, for example, the graphic above, or this photograph of the Sun’s paths through the sky at different times of the year.

The great circle The great circle

So we are used to the fact that the length of daylight is significantly longer in summer than winter, and most of us know that the “longest day” (that is, the day when the Sun is above the horizon the longest) is the summer solstice, around June 21, when the Sun has reached its most northerly and longest track in our sky; and the “shortest day” is the winter solstice, around December 21, when the Sun has reached its most southerly and shortest track in our sky.

It would make sense, then, for the summer solstice to also be the date at which sunrise is earliest and sunset is latest; and for the winter solstice to be the date when sunrise is latest and sunset is earliest. However, that is not what happens! Nature sometimes defies our expectations.

The local meridian is a great circle passing through the celestial poles and through the zenith of an observer’s location on the planet. Image Credit: Daniel V. Schroeder

And that is because we have not talked about one other factor in sunrise and sunset times that is not at all obvious. It is that the Sun moves across the sky, in its apparent daily track, at slightly different rates at different parts of the year. Most of the Sun’s east-to-west apparent motion in the sky is caused, of course, by the rotation of the Earth, which is quite uniform (to milliseconds per day). But a small part of the Sun’s apparent daily motion depends on the position of the Earth in its orbit around the Sun. This component of the Sun’s apparent motion varies by a small amount over the course of a year due to the elliptical shape of the Earth’s orbit and to the tilt of the Earth’s axis.

Earth’s axial tilt

Earth’s axial tilt

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Operation Petticoat

Story

Lieutenant Commander Matt Sherman (Cary Grant) is in charge of the submarine “Sea Tiger,” which was badly damaged at a Philippine shipyard by a Japanese air raid. Seeking to make sail before an oncoming invasion, Sherman enlists the help of newly transferred Lieutenant Nick Holden (Tony Curtis) to use his talents as a con artist to procure the needed supplies. Once they’re underway, Sherman evacuates a group of beautiful nurses, but can’t find anyone who will take them off his hands.

Staring

Initial release: December 3, 1959

Director: Blake Edwards

Starring: Cary Grant; Tony Curtis; Joan O’Brien; Dina Merrill; Gene Evans; Dick Sargent; Arthur O’Connell

Based on: a story suggested by; Paul King; Joseph B. Stone

Music by: David Rose; Henry Mancini (uncredited)

Video clip

Scene: “You see, when a girl’s under 21 she’s protected by law, when she’s over 65 she’s protected by nature. Anywhere in between she’s fair game”.
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Know it All

Definition of know-it-all

Know-it-all: one who claims to know everything Also: one who disdains advice

Synonyms

Smart aleck, wise guy, wiseacre, wisenheimer, smarty pants.

Anchorman movie
Anchorman movie

Examples of ‘know-it-all’ in a sentence

  1. His reputation as an autocratic know-it-all goes before him.
  2. Do not force your opinions on others and definitely do not come across as a know-it-all.
  3. Dad was never a know-it-all, he just wanted me to improve my game.