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So to speak

You use so to speak to draw attention to the fact that you are describing or referring to something in a way that may be amusing or unusual rather than completely accurate.
I ought not to tell you but I will, since you’re in the family, so to speak.

so to speak

A phrase used to indicate that what one has just said is an uncommon, metaphorical, or original way of saying something. Similar to the phrases “if you will” and “in a manner of speaking.” He was a fixer, so to speak—a man who could get things done. This arrangement will allow us to eliminate our debt and get back to solid ground, so to speak.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Used after sentences to express that there is a metaphor in it. It can be generally interchanged with like-clause: 

It is X, so to speak. 
It is like X.

I love this jacket. I always wear it when I go to work. It is a uniform for me, so to speak.

by terb kund April 28, 2009

UrbanDictionary.com

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Jesus H Christ

Jesus Christ
Jesus Christ
The Etymology of Jesus H. Christ

by Peter Kirby (May 11, 2003)

Question: What is the origin of the H. in the phrase, Jesus H. Christ? There is no great mind which has not but come to rest on this important question. It is a question which every man must consider in the course of his education, and the answers discovered are as varied as the approaches taken.

The child brought up in a home of prayer, on first hearing the expletive from his father’s lips, need only look to the words of the Our Father for the explanation: “Our Father, Who Art in Heaven, Harold Be Thy Name.”

A young man who has studied the principles of biology, in contemplating the holy mystery of the Virgin Birth in the light of reason, will inevitably conclude that the H. stands for none other than Haploid, a distinction conferred only upon God’s Son of all men, that He would not have the taint of Original Sin.

The theologian will undoubtedly be familiar with “IHS,” which stands for the Latin phrase “Jesus Hominum Salvator,” which means Jesus, Savior of Man. Note that the J, as a separate character from the I, is only a few centuries old. Jesus ChristThis trigraph is frequently found in medieval and Renaissance art.

An historian may be familiar with the tale that, before an important battle in 312, the Emperor Constantine saw vision of the cross in the sky and heard a voice saying that he would conquer “under this standard” or “in this sign.” The Latin words would be “in hoc signo,” which abbreviates to IHS.

The Greek scholar will look to the Greek letters for Jesus: “iota eta sigma omicron upsilon sigma,” which is variously transliterated IHSOYS or IHCOYC, the latter when converted to Latin letters using the common curved sigma variant. If one takes the first three letters as initials, it is not difficult to derive “Jesus H. Christ.”

The Judaic scholar can supply the reason for taking the first three letters. This is the practice of using standard abbreviations for sacred names, or nomina sacra, accompanied by a horizontal line as a warning that the words cannot be pronounced as written. The two most common forms are abbreviation by suspension, which is to use the first two letters, and abbreviation by contraction, which is to use the first and last letters.

A scholar of manuscripts noted that such abbreviations in early Christian fragments take the form IS, IH, or IHS when writing the Greek name Jesus. This would provide the basis for clever Latin writers later to make this sacred abbreviation of the name Jesus into a three letter acronym, a sort of pun, including “In Hoc Signo” and “Jesus Hominum Salvator.”

The earliest writer to speculate on the initials of Jesus is the author of the 2nd century “Epistle of Barnabas” (9:6-7). In Lightfoot’s translation, “Learn therefore, children of love, concerning all things abundantly, that Abraham, who first appointed circumcision, looked forward in the spirit unto Jesus, when he circumcised having received the ordinances of three letters. For the scripture saith; And Abraham circumcised of his household eighteen males and three hundred. What then was the knowledge given unto him? Understand ye that He saith the eighteen first, and then after an interval three hundred. In the eighteen ‘I’ stands for ten, ‘H’ for eight. Here thou hast JESUS (IHSOYS). And because the cross in the ‘T’ was to have grace, He saith also three hundred. So He revealeth Jesus in the two letters, and in the remaining one the cross.”

A man who has wondered about the origin of the sacred middle initial, who has traced the etymological thread back to its ancient spool, and who has detailed the findings of his serious inquiry, may take a moment to reflect upon the nature of the question, a question that he has expended great efforts to understand.

Jesus H. Christ!

Circumspectful meta-pondering produces ineffable epiphany. Now that we have an answer, the question is, why did we ask the question? What is it that makes a man concerned to know the details of a matter so trivial, so irrelevant so as to seem beneath the briefest consideration? I am not sure that I know the answer to this question. But at least now I know that I am not the only one who suffers from acute curiosity, for, indeed, you have read it all to the end.

Source: http://www.christianorigins.com/etymology.html


  1. “Jesus H. Christ” is a common phrase which references Jesus Christ, the central figure of Christianity. Considered by some to be a vulgarism, it is typically uttered in anger, surprise, or frustration, though sometimes also with humorous intent.
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Dead Pan Humor

Steven Wright

Dry humor with a blank expressionless face. This type of humor is common among shy and socially indifferent people. Includes other elements of humor ranging from shy humor, sarcastic even macabre humor and other personal characteristics which makes it unique to the individual. Deadpan humor is one of the most complex and to many enigmatic comedy styles as only a select few truly understand it enough to appreciate it for it’s brilliance.

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Micro-Moments Now: 3 new consumer behaviors playing out in Google search data

Think-With-Google-Micro-Moments-Venn-Diagram

By Lisa Gevelber Jul 2017 Mobile, Search, Micro-Moments  

Mobile Search
Mobile Search

People’s search behavior is evolving and their expectations are becoming clear. Google’s VP of Marketing for the Americas Lisa Gevelber gives a glimpse of the consumer taking shape behind the data.

  1. The “well-advised” consumer
  2. The “right here” consumer
  3. The “right now” consumer

Two years ago, Google introduced the concept of micro-moments. We put a name to a behavior that, thanks to mobile, was becoming pervasive. People had started to expect an immediate answer in the moments they wanted to know, go, do, and buy. The concept of micro-moments was perhaps as truthful, observable, and relatable a consumer behavior trend as any marketer could wish for.

Continue reading Micro-Moments Now: 3 new consumer behaviors playing out in Google search data

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Pull the plug

Pull the plug
Pull the plug
1. Lit. to turn off someone’s life-support system in a hospital. (Based on pull the plug (on something) {2}. This results in the death of the person whose life support has been terminated.) They had to get a court order to pull the plug on their father. Fred signed a living will making it possible to pull the plug on him without a court order.

  1. Fig. to put an end to someone’s activities or plans. (Based on pull the plug (on something) {2}.) The mayor was doing a fine job until the treasurer pulled the plug on him. David pulled the plug on Fred, who was taking too long with the project.
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pulling the strings

Pulling the strings
Pulling the strings

COMMON If someone pulls the strings, they control everything that another person or an organization does, often in a way that is not noticed by people. He engineered many of these political changes, pulling the strings from behind the stage. He is the kind of man who prefers to work behind the scenes, pulling the strings.

Note: The image here is of a puppet which is controlled by means of strings.

Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

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Pay your dues

paying your dues
Pay your dues
Pay your dues

To earn the right to have something because you worked hard: For example: “I’ve paid my dues for the last 25 years, and now I’m ready for a comfortable retirement.”

Usually, dues. a regular fee or charge payable at specific intervals, especially to a group or organization: membership dues.

 

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Across the pond

Across the Pond

United Kingdom
United Kingdom

The North Atlantic Ocean between North America and Europe. It is most often used to describe travel or location between the United Kingdom and the United States or Canada.

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Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine
Thomas Paine
Thomas Paine

Lead, follow, or get out of the way. 

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Happily ever after

Happily ever after

Happily ever after
Happily ever after

The new economic realities of the 19th century then cross-pollinated with the ideas that emerged from the Enlightenment about individual rights and the pursuit of happiness, and the result was a full-blown Age of Romanticism. It was the 1800s and people’s feelings suddenly mattered. The new ideal was not only to marry for love but that that love was to live on in bliss for all of the eternity. Thus, it wasn’t until the relatively recent 150 years ago that the ever-popular “happily ever after” ideal was born.

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Under the radar

under the radar
under the radar
under the radar

The definition of “under the radar” is: doing something without other people noticing. For example, “The employee didn’t want his boss to find out that he was looking for another job, so he did all his searching under the radar.”

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Putting on airs

If someone is “putting on airs” it means that he or she is acting superior or snobbish.
Since the 1500s, “airs” has referred to having an affected manner. It’s from the French word air, “look, appearance, or bearing.” Behaving as if you’re better than other people — wealthier, better dressed, or better educated — is to put on airs. Acting like you know more than your teacher is a way to put on airs.