Posted on Leave a comment

Nostradamus Prophecies | The Third Antichrist Prophecy

Five centuries ago, Nostradamus wrote of three Antichrists. Two, Napoleon and Hitler, have already bathed the world in blood—but it is the third who will bring the Apocalypse.

Nostradamus
Michel de Nostredame by his son Cesar

Michel de Nostredame (depending on the source, 14 or 21 December 1503 – 1 or 2 July 1566), usually Latinised as Nostradamus, was a French astrologer, physician and reputed seer, who is best known for his book Les Prophéties, is a collection of 942 poetic quatrains allegedly predicting future events. The book was first published in 1555. The rhymed quatrains (4-line poems) are grouped into sets of 100, called Centuries.

Nostradamus enthusiasts have credited him with predicting a copious number of events in world history, including the French Revolution, the atom bomb, the rise of Adolf Hitler and the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center. Detractors, however, see such predictions as examples of vaticinium ex eventu, retroactive clairvoyance and selective thinking, which find non-existent patterns in ambiguous statements. Because of this, it has been claimed that Nostradamus is

“100% accurate at predicting events after they happen”.

Nostradamus

The Third Antichrist movie clip

Nostradamus Prophecies | The Third Antichrist clip
The Third Antichrist | Full movie

Biography

https://youtu.be/

The first Antichrist

Napoleon Bonaparte

The First Antichrist of the book of Revelation leads the 7th world empire to oppress God’s people, and will lead an army of “locusts” that will create more destruction, capture more land, and kill more people than any army in history. The First Antichrist will spread the concepts of the liberal “Enlightenment” around the globe, and crown himself emperor of both the religious and secular realm. He’ll be granted power to hold the church and its leaders in captivity for 42 months and he will set ten kings to watch over his seven nation empire.

NOSTRADAMUS QUATRAIN #8 – 1

PAX NEY LORON will be more fire than blood,

   PAX NEY LORON plus feu qu’a sang fera,

   Bathed in praise, a great escape is assured;

   Laude nager, fuir grand au surrez;

   Those worried will refuse him entry,

   Les agasses entree refusera,

   But doubtful that for long they will hold him confined.

Pampon, durance les tiendra enferrez.

The second Antichrist

Adolf Hitler

In Revelation Chapter 13, the Bible tells us that after the First Antichrist is destroyed, their comes a Second Antichrist (Second Beast) who leads the eighth empire attempting to conquer the world. This modern antichrist appears having two horns like a lamb, and therefore presents himself as a modern messiah. He tells his promised people that he will create a perfect human society for them lasting for 1000 years. He will attack and conquer many nations under the sign of the cross (Hellas Cross), and spreads his ideas using a man-made idol (invention) that has the power of speech (radio?).

NOSTRADAMUS QUATRAIN #10-66

   The Prime Minister of London (is supported) by America,

   Le chef de Londres par regne l”Americh,

   As the Isles of the Scots will suffer from frost;

   L’isle d’Escosse tempiera par gelee;

   An errant Fuhrer will become such an evil antichrist,

Roy Reb auront un si grand antechrist,

   That he will draw everyone into the conflict.

Que les mettra trestous dans la meslee.

The third Antichrist

TBD…

Prophecies

Biography

Born in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in the south of France in December 1503, Michel de Nostredame was the son of a grain dealer who was also a prosperous home-grown notary. His family was originally Jewish, but had converted to Catholicism during the previous century. Nothing is known about his childhood, but at the age of fifteen he entered the University of Avignon to study for his baccalaureate. After little more than a year he was forced by the Plague to leave again. In 1529, after some years as an apothecary, he entered the University of Montpellier to study for a doctorate in medicine, but was promptly expelled again when it was discovered that he had been an apothecary, which was a ‘manual’ trade expressly banned by the university statutes. He then continued work as an apothecary, and created a “rose pill” that was widely believed to protect against the the plague.

In 1531 he was invited by Jules-César Scaliger, a leading Renaissance man, to come to Agen. There Nostradamus married a woman whose name is still in dispute (possibly Henriette d’Encausse), but who bore him two children. In 1534, however, his wife and children died, presumably from the plague. After their death he continued to travel, passing through France and possibly Italy.

He settled down in 1547 in Salon-de-Provence, where he married a rich widow named Anne Ponsarde Gemelle and eventually had six children – three daughters and three sons. After a further visit to Italy, he began to move away from medicine and towards the occult. He wrote an almanac for 1550, for the first time Latinising his name to ‘Nostradamus’, and was so encouraged by its success that he decided to write one or more annually. Taken together, they are known to have contained at least 6338 prophecies (most of them, in the event, failed predictions), as well as at least 11 annual calendars, all of them starting on 1st January and not, as is sometimes supposed, in March. He then began his project of writing 1,000 quatrains, which form the supposed prophecies for which he is famous today. Feeling vulnerable to religious fanatics, however, he devised a method of obscuring his meaning by using “Virgilianised” syntax, word games and a mixture of languages such as Provençal, Greek, Latin and Italian. For technical reasons connected with their publication in three instalments, the last 58 quatrains of the seventh ‘Century’, or book of 100 verses, were never published.

The quatrains, written in a book titled “Les Propheties”, received a mixed reaction when they were published. Some people thought Nostradamus was a servant of evil, a fake, or insane, while many of the elite thought his quatrains were spiritually inspired prophecies. Soon nobility came from all over to receive horoscopes and advice from him, though he normally expected them to supply the birthcharts on which they were based. Catherine de Médicis, the queen consort of King Henry II of France, was one of Nostradamus’ admirers. After reading his almanacs for 1555, which hinted at unnamed threats to the royal family, she summoned him to Paris to explain them, as well as to draw up horoscopes for her royal children. At the time he feared that he would be beheaded, but by the time of his death in 1566, she had made him Counselor and Physician in Ordinary to the King.

By 1566 Nostradamus’s gout, which had painfully plagued him for many years and made movement very difficult, finally turned into dropsy. At the beginning of July, after making an extended will and a much shorter codicil, he is alleged to have told his secretary Jean de Chavigny, “You will not find me alive by sunrise.” The next morning he was reportedly found dead, lying on the floor between his bed and a makeshift bench.

Some biographical accounts of Nostradamus’ life state that he was afraid of being persecuted for heresy by the Inquisition, but neither prophecy nor astrology fell under this bracket, and he would have been in danger only if he had practised magic to support them. In fact, his relations with the Church as a prophet and healer were always excellent. His brief imprisonment at Marignane in late 1561 came about purely because he had published his 1562 almanac without the prior permission of a bishop, contrary to a recent royal decree.

NOSTRADAMUS QUATRAINS

http://www.godswatcher.com/quatrains.htmhttp://www.nostradamus.org/bio.html
Partial Source: http://www.godswatcher.com/index.htm, http://www.nostradamus.org/bio.html, Wikipedia, YouTube

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.