Posted on Leave a comment

Trisepalous

trisepalous

trisepalous

ADJECTIVE: Having three sepals. Used of the calyx of a flower.

This is one of the most common and shortest Irises at the time of flowering. As in most Irises the three sepals are decorated, in this case with a crest. The rhizome likes to be on or near the surface and the plant is almost always found in dense stands.

Posted on Leave a comment

Waxwing

waxwing

waxwing

any of three species of perching songbirds of the Northern Hemisphere. Waxwings have crests (raised only in alarm) and sleek brownish-gray plumage with flecks of red pigment resembling sealing wax on the wings and a yellow band on the tail tip.

Continue reading Waxwing

Posted on Leave a comment

Whole Gale (A).

A very heavy wind. The three degrees are a fresh gale, a strong gale, and a heavy or whole gale.

Posted on Leave a comment

Watershed (n.)

has three Standard meanings. It is the dividing line between an area drained by a river running in one direction and one drained by another river running in an opposite direction.

Continue reading Watershed (n.)

Posted on Leave a comment

Three Pagodas Pass

mountain pass, alt. 925 ft (282 m), at the southern end of the Dawna Range, on the Myanmar-Thailand border. It has long been the chief route between SE Myanmar and the Chao Phraya valley of Thailand.

Posted on Leave a comment

Three Tuns

A fish ordinary in Billingsgate, famous as far back as the reign of Queen Anne.

Posted on Leave a comment

Plynlimon

or Plinlimon , Welsh Plumlumon Fawr, mountain, 2,468 ft (752 m) high, W Wales, on the Powys-Ceredigion border W of Llanidloes. It has three summits and is the source of the Wye, Severn, and other waters.

Posted on Leave a comment

Cycad

The cycad is any plant of the order Cycadales, tropical and subtropical palmlike evergreens. The cycads, ginkgos, and conifers comprise the three major orders of gymnosperms, or cone-bearing plants (see cone and plant).

Continue reading Cycad

Posted on Leave a comment

Sakurajima

A peninsula, Kagoshima prefecture, S Kyushu, Japan, opposite Kagoshima. Formerly an island, Sakurajima became a peninsula in 1914 when lava from three volcanic cones closed the channel (Mt. Sakurajima is still active). Its fruits and turnips are famous throughout Japan.

Posted on Leave a comment

Quail

Common name for a variety of small game birds related to the partridge, pheasant, and more distantly to the grouse. There are three subfamilies in the quail family: the New World quails; the Old World quails and partridges; and the true pheasants and seafowls.

Continue reading Quail

Posted on Leave a comment

Poodle

poodle
Choose a Poodle for Breeding
Choose a Poodle for Breeding

The poodle is a popular breed of dog probably originating in Germany but generally associated with France, where it has been raised for centuries. There are three varieties, differing in size only.

The standard poodle, classified in the nonsporting-dog group (see nonsporting dog), stands over 15 in. (38.1 cm) high at the shoulder and weighs from 40 to 55 lb (18.1/24.9 kg). The miniature, also listed in the nonsporting-dog group, stands from 10 to 15 in. (25.4/38.1 cm) high at the withers and weighs from 14 to 16 lb (6.4/7.3 kg).

The toy poodle, which is classified as a toy dog, stands up to 10 in. (25.4 cm) high at the shoulder and weighs about 6 lb (2.7 kg). The profuse coat is dense and hard-textured and may be any solid color. If left untended, the coat will grow out in matted, rope like cords. The poodle is clipped in a variety of styles (e.g., the puppy trim, the continental clip, and the English-saddle clip), a practice now carried out largely for show or aesthetic purposes but originally for utilitarian value.

The poodle was widely used in France as a waterfowl retriever, but its heavy coat required clipping so as not to hinder the dog?s progress through water. The poodle has also been raised as a circus and vaudeville performer and as a hunter of truffles. Today it is usually kept as a companion and pet.

Posted on Leave a comment

Triggerfish

Triggerfish
Triggerfish
A triggerfish is any of several species of tropical reef fishes with laterally compressed bodies, heavy scales, and tough skins. They are named for the mechanism of the three spines of the dorsal fin: when the fish is alarmed the first of these spines is locked upright by the second and drops only when the latter is pressed like a trigger.

Continue reading Triggerfish