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Tripartite Pact

In the pact the three nations agreed that for the next ten years they would “stand by and co-operate with one another in… their prime purpose to establish and maintain a new order of things… to promote the mutual prosperity and welfare of the peoples concerned”. They recognized each other’s spheres of interest and undertook “to assist one another with all political, economic and military means when one of the three contracting powers is attacked” by a country not already involved in the war, excluding the Soviet Union.

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German school tracks

In Germany, there are three school tracks for students determined in 4th grade:

 
  •  Hauptschule – you go to school from 5th to 9th grade.
  •  Rearschule – you go to school from 5th to 11th grade.
  •  Gynasium – you go to school from 5th to 13th grade.
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Morse Code – SOS

The Morse code for a ship in distress is SOS. This signal has sounds (short ones sound like di, and long ones sound like daw) associated with each letter. So, S is dit dit dit , O is daw daw daw, and S again is dit dit dit. Each of the three letters has three sounds! Pretty cool. Put them together and you get dit dit dit daw daw daw dit dit dit. (My Dad was a communications officer on submarines). Continue reading Morse Code – SOS

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Triple Alliance and Triple Entente

WW I soldiersThe Triple Alliance and Triple Entente are two opposing international combinations of states that dominated Europe’s history from 1882 until they came into armed conflict as the Central Powers and the Allies, respectively, in WORLD WAR I. Although there were numerous areas of contention between the two groups, the two principal problems that finally brought them to war involved rival claims in Morocco and the Balkans


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The Titanic

Titanic

Titanic

On the titanic there were three sections of people;

  • 1st class
  • 2nd class
  • 3rd class

Titanic – History of a disaster 

On April 14,1912 a great ship called the Titanic sank on its maiden voyage. That night there were many warnings of icebergs from other ships. There seems to be a conflict on whether or not the warnings reached the bridge. We may never know the answer to this question. The greatest tragedy of all may be that there were not enough lifeboats for everyone on board. According to Walter Lord, Continue reading The Titanic

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submarine surfacing – buoyancy

submarine surfacing

submarine surfacing

When a submarine surfaces, three sounds are made to signal the crew (two sounds to signal diving).  A submarine or a ship can float because the weight of water that it displaces is equal to the weight of the ship. This displacement of water creates an upward force called the buoyant force and acts opposite to gravity, which would pull the ship down. Unlike a ship, a submarine can control its buoyancy, thus allowing it to sink and surface at will. Continue reading submarine surfacing – buoyancy

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Nina, Pinta, and the Santa Maria

Nina, Pinta, and the Santa Maria
Nina, Pinta, and Santa Maria

Nina, Pinta, and Santa Maria

Christopher Columbus departed from Spain on August 3, 1492, on a fleet of three ships: the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria. Nina and Pinta were both smaller, sleeker ships, called caravels. Santa Maria was a larger, round-hulled ship, called a nao. Columbus himself sailed on, and piloted, the Santa Maria. Together, the three ships carried about 120 men, equipment and supplies.

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Ralph E. Freeman – MIT

I’ve also told people that if they are not considering three things then they are not thinking productively (take economics: you can spend money productively, you can throw it away or you can save it until you’ve found a good use for it – this came from Ralph E. Freeman who was head of th Ec Dept when I was a student at MIT.